Ruth Bader Ginsburg Magnet
Ruth Bader Ginsburg Magnet
Ruth Bader Ginsburg Magnet
Ruth Bader Ginsburg Magnet
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg Magnet

Vendor
Roeda Brighten Your Life
Regular price
$29.99
Sale price
$29.99
Regular price
Sold out
Unit price
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Each piece of Roeda decorative art is laser cut from metal and hand-painted—a magnetic work of art!

Metal art magnets are designed to be combined with Roeda frames and memo boards to create whimsical, colorful, personalized art for your home. The final creation is up to you!

  • Made in the USA. Hand-painted at Roeda Studio in Grand Rapids, MI.
  • Easily switch magnets for the season, a holiday, or a family celebration. 
  • Includes super strong magnets that will easily hold your notes and photos. 
  • Measures 4.3"h x 2.8"w

Ruth Bader Ginsburg

"Women belong in all places where decisions are being made. It shouldn't be that women are the exception."

As a lifelong trailblazer for human rights and gender equality, Ruth Bader Ginsburg has made an indelible mark on the United States in her role as a U.S. Supreme Court Justice since August 10, 1993. She is the second female justice of four to be confirmed to the court and has authored many notable opinions.

Justice Ginsburg earned her bachelor's degree at Cornell University and later studied law at Columbia, where she was one of the few women in her class. She spent a considerable part of her legal career as an advocate for the advancement of gender equality and women's rights, winning multiple victories arguing before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer lawyer for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsels in the 1970s.

In 1972, Justice Ginsburg co-founded the Women's Rights Project at the ACLU. As the director of the Project, she argued six gender discrimination cases before the Supreme Court and won five. Justice Ginsburg charted a strategic course, taking aim at specific discriminatory statutes. She chose plaintiffs carefully, at times picking male plaintiffs to demonstrate that gender discrimination was harmful to both men and women. She attained a reputation as a skilled advocate and her work led directly to the end of gender discrimination in many areas of the law. She has been and remains to this day, an example of perseverance, determination, and steadfastness in the face of adversity.